Friday, June 6, 2014

Commemorating the 70th anniversary of D-Day

At a time when our military might seems to be in the sights of an administration that doesn't appear to appreciate such a requirement, a government embroiled in one administrative scandal after the next affecting our armed forces, let us pause for a moment on this day to remember the price of freedom...and let us not allow ourselves to take it for granted.

Army.mil: On June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline, to fight Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, France. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower called the operation a crusade in which, “we will accept nothing less than full victory.” More than 5,000 Ships and 13,000 aircraft supported the D-Day invasion, and by day’s end, the Allies gained a foot-hold in Continental Europe. The cost in lives on D-Day was high. More than 9,000 Allied Soldiers were killed or wounded, but their sacrifice allowed more than 100,000 Soldiers to begin the slow, hard slog across Europe, to defeat Adolf Hitler’s crack troops.

Navy.mil: On June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline. It was on the beaches of Normandy, France, that more than 9,000 allied soldiers were killed or wounded in the fight against Nazi Germany. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower termed the operation a crusade in which, "we will accept nothing less than full victory." More than 5,000 ships and 13,000 aircraft supported the D-Day invasion, and by day's end, the allies gained a foothold in continental Europe. The cost in lives on D-Day was high but their sacrifice allowed more than 100,000 soldiers to begin the slow, hard trudge across Europe to defeat Adolph Hitler.
History: During World War II (1939-1945), the Battle of Normandy, which lasted from June 1944 to August 1944, resulted in the Allied liberation of Western Europe from Nazi Germany’s control. Codenamed Operation Overlord, the battle began on June 6, 1944, also known as D-Day, when some 156,000 American, British and Canadian forces landed on five beaches along a 50-mile stretch of the heavily fortified coast of France’s Normandy region. The invasion was one of the largest amphibious military assaults in history and required extensive planning. Prior to D-Day, the Allies conducted a large-scale deception campaign designed to mislead the Germans about the intended invasion target. By late August 1944, all of northern France had been liberated, and by the following spring the Allies had defeated the Germans. The Normandy landings have been called the beginning of the end of war in Europe.
What better way to commemorate the 70th anniversary of D-Day than with one of President Reagan's addresses commemorating the 40th anniversary of the Normandy Invasion to remind us of this operation's significance:


Also: Normandy Speech: Ceremony Commemorating the 40th Anniversary of the Normandy Invasion, D-Day 6/6/84

And most important of all, let us contemplate on the words of those veterans still with us as they recall the battle 70 years later to liberate Europe and ultimately protect the world from tyranny...









Despite the political turmoil of the days, we, AMERICANS, honor you and all of the fallen today, gentlemen.

May your strength, your bravery and your vigilance guide us home.

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